Fredonia Foundation Classes by Category

American History
 

Students will explore, through literature, primary historical texts, and/or other genres and media, central U.S. myths and cultural narratives. Individual sections will examine particular themes chosen by the instructor.

Students will delve into historical and recent American literature, across multiple genres and in relation to multiple institutions and media, that relates to the experience of “becoming Americans.”

An exploration of the historical construction of American gender, ethnicity/race, and class; their present status; and their literary and cultural representations. Focusing on the intersections between these categories of identity, the course will utilize an interdisciplinary approach, integrating materials from such fields as literary studies, history, gender studies, ethnic studies, geography, sociology, music, and art.

Study of the intellectual and social origins of the discipline known as African American Studies. Key concepts, themes, and theories of the discipline will be discussed in the class.

American Pasts is a critical examination of a narrative of American History. The focus of the course will vary semester to semester, but this course will help students develop an understanding of American History by analyzing sources and events from different perspectives. Refer to the History Department website for specific topics/focus.

American Patterns is a creative examination of a narrative of American History. The focus of the course and the pedagogies used will vary semester to semester, but this course will help students develop an understanding of American History by exploring the creative production of history using primary and secondary sources written from multiple perspectives. Refer to the History Department website for specific topics/focus.

Examination of basic concepts of law, and how these have changed over time; and of the interrelationships of American law to the social settings in which it is made, and which it in turn influences.

An examination of Anglo-American legal principles based upon the analysis of court cases and hypothetical fact situations. The range of topics covered includes criminal law and procedure, legal remedies, torts, and contracts. The course highlights the historical development of these principles and values that are explored through simulations and structured debates.

What was, and is, a “Great” Society? This question serves as the historical and metaphorical theme as we journey from 1600 to 1968 exploring how and why the United States helps, or doesn’t help, vulnerable citizens. Ideas related to democracy, policy, social contracts, human rights, oppression, social justice, benevolence, and social control are explored

 

Arts
 

Introductory course investigating the principles and elements of visual design. Unity, emphasis, balance, scale, line, form, texture, rhythm, and color are explored through two-dimensional studio problems.
Theory and practice in a variety of graphic media. Conte, ink, pencil, and charcoal used in studio problems to acquaint beginning student with full range of drawing possibilities.
Photographic Explorations is an introduction to the workings of light and cameras, interpretation and perception, philosophical and psychological experience to explore image culture. In addition to learning techniques for producing light- and lens-based images, students will become acquainted with historical and contemporary uses of these techniques. Through a combination of classroom talks and hands-on projects, students will explore the principles of photography. The course is designed to serve students with no prior background in photography and is not intended for visual arts or photography majors. A camera that can take electronic still images is required (this can range from a digital SLR to camera phone).

This course introduces students to how the elements of production (lighting, color, framing, sound, etc.) are utilized in media, to shape the meaning of the content and manipulate the perception of the audience. Intentionality, the influence of culture on perception, and media ethics are themes presented throughout the course.

A Fredonia Foundations lab based course which satisfies a 3-credit hour arts requirement. This course introduces multimedia systems from a theoretical and practical perspective. Topics covered include: computer manipulation of images, music, animation, and video; theoretical aspects of lighting, color, elementary acoustics principles, motion, perspective, graphical and sound file formats, and network transmission. Various software packages will be introduced: for raster and vector graphics; for 2-D and 3-D modeling and animation; for sound recording and editing. Blender will be the principal software and is open source software providing a cost savings to both the students and the institution. Using these software packages and applying the principles learned in the course, students will practice creating, processing, and modifying graphics and sound. Students will gain practical hands-on experience through the course work and understand the operating principles of multimedia systems. Students are expected to be able to describe at least one principal form of artistic expression and be able to explain the methods used to create that form. No programming background is assumed.
 

DANC 100 - Introduction to Dance is an entry-level course which will provide the student with an understanding of the multi-faceted aspects of dance as a global performing art. Students will acquire basic knowledge and skills in at least three distinctly diverse styles of concert dance and will, through creative thinking and innovation, approach numerous dance related topics from the perspective of a practitioner as well as a critical observer of dance. No previous experience with dance is required to succeed in this course.

Students will study the important features of an artistic form as they prepare to create their own version of it. Examples could include poetry, drama, graphic memoir, fiction.

This course explores the sonic dimensions of language and the materiality of sound in creative texts like verse, lyric, and oratory. Students will study the play and purpose of sound as both structure and device in an artistic form as they prepare to create their own versions of it. Examples could include poems for page and/or performance, song lyrics, musicals, oratory, and experimental traditions.

First in the sequence of creative writing courses, the prerequisite for all higher level creative writing. Conducted in an informal workshop format, the course provides practical experience in the writing and evaluation of poetry and short fiction. Basic forms, prosodies, techniques, genres, and the problems they pose are considered through study of historical and contemporary examples, and through writing assignments. 

A course primarily for students with little or no previous musical knowledge or skill. Examines the relationships among music, play and self, especially with regard to children. Emphasizes activity, creativity and personal expression.

Introduction to music in a wide range of styles and historical/cultural contexts: materials of music (melody, harmony, rhythm, tempo, dynamics, musical structure and design, and musical style); various performance media. Major composers of each musical epoch discussed, musical examples listened to in class. Covers 19th century Romanticism; medieval, renaissance, and baroque music; the 20th century, popular and world music, jazz and Modernism.
 

Non-technical introduction to ethnomusicology. Survey of musical styles from around the world emphasizing how music reflects and influences society.
 

Much of the critical discourse about music centers on separating the “great” from the average. This is a course about greatness in music. In it we will discuss the mythologies and commonly perceived criteria that define cultural importance or technical greatness in music. We will look for common rhetoric across many different genres and will deal with popular images of music in film and criticism, the technical parameters of “great” music, and the interpretation of music.

A broad introduction to the Performing Arts including an historical perspective, elements of the performer's craft and repertoire, representative contributors, and the role of the audience member. The Performing Arts areas include theatre, music, dance, and opera. Attendance at four performing arts events is required.

 

Foreign Language
 

Students develop essential communicative skills and cultural awareness necessary in order to interact with people from that culture, whether it is in their home country or in the United States.
In order to take this course, students must have scored a level 2 or 3 in the approved placement test or have taken the introductory course ARBC 100 at Fredonia.
 

Students develop essential communicative skills and cultural awareness necessary in order to interact with people from that culture, whether it is in their home country or in the United States.
In order to take this course, students must have scored a level 2 or 3 in the approved placement test or have taken the introductory course SPAN 100 at Fredonia.
 

Students develop essential communicative skills and cultural awareness necessary in order to interact with people from that culture, whether it is in their home country or in the United States.
In order to take this course, students must have scored a level 2 or 3 in the approved placement test or have taken the introductory course FREN 100 at Fredonia.
 

Students develop essential communicative skills and cultural awareness necessary in order to interact with people from that culture, whether it is in their home country or in the United States.
In order to take this course, students must have scored a level 2 or 3 in the approved placement test or have taken the introductory course GERM 100 at Fredonia.
 

Students develop essential communicative skills and cultural awareness necessary in order to interact with people from that culture, whether it is in their home country or in the United States.
In order to take this course, students must have scored a level 2 or 3 in the approved placement test or have taken the introductory course ITAL 100 at Fredonia.
 

Students develop essential communicative skills and cultural awareness necessary in order to interact with people from that culture, whether it is in their home country or in the United States.
In order to take this course, students must have scored a level 2 or 3 in the approved placement test or have taken the introductory course RUSS 100 at Fredonia.
 

Students develop essential communicative skills and cultural awareness necessary in order to interact with people from that culture, whether it is in their home country or in the United States.
In order to take this course, students must have scored a level 2 or 3 in the approved placement test or have taken the introductory course SPAN 100 at Fredonia.
 

The course Increases proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Spanish. Further development of vocabulary and grammar. Selected cultural materials will provide cultural awareness and cross cultural proficiency to the students.
The course Increases proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Spanish. Further development of vocabulary and grammar. Selected cultural materials will provide cultural awareness and cross cultural proficiency to the students.

 

Humanities
 

The course provides a broad introduction to the field of communication focusing on both interpersonal and mediated communication. The course goal is to help one think critically about everyday interactions and to "discover" the degree in which the content and forms of communication contribute to creating meaning, and shaping personal and social realities. The process of meaning-making will be examined to help one become a more effective communicator, especially in situations where communicators experience "difference" with others within and across cultures.
 

Students will explore constructions of humanity and enduring questions about the human experience through inquiry into thematic readings of literature, film, and/or other genres and media.
Through drama or film, students will explore significant questions and issues related to being human.

A study of the ways in which writers and others use the written word as a form of social critique and to effect social change.

Explains the origins and evolution of Native American Studies as a program, placing it within the historical, political, social and cultural context in which it developed. Students will learn why a multidisciplinary approach can be beneficial to the understanding of Native American experiences in North America. This course explores the different sets of knowledge produced by and about Native Americans and the complicated relationship between Native Americans and the United States government. By interrogating representations of American Indian identity, this course will engage students in discussions about the complexity of race, self-representation, and cultural politics.

An interdisciplinary approach to historicizing the Latinx experience in U.S. history. The course examines the political and cultural dynamics of Puerto Ricans, Mexicans, Cubans, and Dominicans within an historical context sensitive to changes and continuities in American history.

An interdisciplinary approach to historicizing the Latinx experience in U.S. history. The course examines the political and cultural dynamics of Puerto Ricans, Mexicans, Cubans, and Dominicans within an historical context sensitive to changes and continuities in American history.

With a thematic approach, the course will introduce students to the films of a specific country(ies) and/or culture(s). The films will be analyzed as art objects and serve as a text through which students will learn about the history, beliefs, and socio-political issues affecting the culture(s). Films will be watched in the original version with subtitles in order to expose students to the language in which they were shot. The course can be repeated as its content changes.

The course concerns the study and practice of critical thinking through analysis of issues in theoretical philosophy, applied philosophy, and the public sphere more generally. By applying critical thinking skills to controversial issues and dramatic examples, students will engage in careful thought and hone their analytic skills. The primary feature of the course is the consideration of an abundance of issues, examples, and applications from philosophy and everyday life, ranging from human nature to the courtroom and political debate, and from advertising to current moral and social issues.

Discussion of some central problems in philosophy such as the existence of God, the ultimate nature of reality, the conditions for knowledge, the question of free will versus determinism, and the foundations of morality. How should one live? Why would God allow evil? How much can we know about the world around us? Do we have free will? Can we survive death? Such questions are universal and fundamental to all humanity.

This class looks at the nature of morality, across and within specific cultures from various parts of the world. Specifically, it looks at the status of moral sentences, what morality is about (right, good, and virtue), and specific moral issues.

The class explores fundamental issues relating to life and death. In particular, it looks at what constitutes life and what, if anything, makes life good. It also investigates what constitutes death and whether death is bad. Using these notions, the class then analyzes particular moral issues surrounding life and death, such as the moral status of the following practices: abortion, suicide, euthanasia, capital punishment, and war.

Philosophical problems in the arts. Nature of art and aesthetic appreciation; aesthetic attitude, experience, and emotion; relations between art and art institutions; interpretation and evaluation of works of art are among topics considered. Problems specific to music, film, literature, painting, and sculpture are also discussed.

This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to the study of LGBTQ American identities, combining historical and literary analysis and methodologies. We will examine major events, developments, themes, and concepts within LGBTQ American history from the nineteenth-century to the present. Sexual orientation and gender identity will also be examined in relation to other marginalized identity positions and systems of privilege and oppression.
 

 

Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning
 

Introductory programming course using a high-level, object -oriented language, such as ALICE. The course covers object-oriented and event driven programming concepts, in addition to algorithms and elementary programming techniques that are needed to develop elementary graphics and multimedia applications. Prerequisite: N.Y.S. Algebra II and Trigonometry (or Math B), or equivalent.
Introduction to microcomputers; elementary concepts and operations of spreadsheets and database management systems; analysis of a variety of problems, their design, and implementation of solutions using commercially available window-based software. Three units of high school mathematics required.
This is a Fredonia Foundations lab-based course that fulfills 3-credit hour mathematics and quantitative reasoning requirement. This is an introductory course in high level programming language, Visual Basic (VB), which introduces elementary ideas of object-oriented and event-driven programming, concepts using VB.

Hands-on exposure to the following major topics: Problem solving, algorithm design and development, structure of the program, top-down design and functional decomposition, debugging, elementary data types, expressions, I/O functions and formats, repetition and control structures, user-defined functions, pass by value, pass by reference, built-in functions, arrays, strings. 

Emphasizes the real-world significance of mathematics and the applications of several areas of mathematics. Some topics: design of street networks, planning and scheduling, weighted voting systems, fair division and apportionment, measuring populations and the universe, and statistics. Background assumed: N.Y.S. Algebra II and Trigonometry (or Math B), or equivalent. 

An introduction to differential and integral calculus for functions of a single variable with applications to the management, social, and life sciences. Not open to students majoring in mathematics, physics, or chemistry. Background assumed: Preparation equivalent to MATH 105 or MATH 106. Credit may not be earned for both MATH 120 and MATH 122. 

Functions, inverse functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, indeterminate forms, antiderivatives; applications to rectilinear motion, graphing, maxima-minima, related rates; computational technology. Background assumed: Preparation equivalent to MATH 105 or MATH 106. Credit will not be given for both MATH 120 and MATH 122. 

The course explores the foundational concepts of modern mathematics. A problem solving approach is incorporated to discover fundamental structure and meaning associated with central content themes of Number Systems, Functions/Patterns, Statistics/Probability, Geometry, and Measurement.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
 

Investigation of basic principles of descriptive and inferential statistics used in the social sciences. A sample of the topics covered includes probability, hypothesis testing (e.g., t-tests, analysis of variance, non-parametrics), correlation and regression. Both raw score formulas and computer software are employed for computational purposes. 

An introduction to the place of statistics in the research process; develops understanding of statistics as a valuable tool in analyzing data. Deals with probability, sampling, tables, graphs, averages, measure of variation, measures of association, tests of significance, and multivariate statistics. Special emphasis given to analysis of survey data using computers. Note: Credit for at most one of the following courses may be applied towards a student's requirements for graduation: BUAD 200, ECON 200, EDU 200, POLI 200, SOC 200, and STAT 200.

Introduction to statistical methods with special emphasis on uses in the natural sciences. Topics will include descriptive statistics, data collection, probability distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, regression, and analysis of variance. The course will include use of analytical labs and statistical computer packages. Background assumed: N.Y.S. Algebra II and Trigonometry (or Math B), or equivalent. 

 

Natural Sciences
 

The course will provide an introduction to human biology and health focusing on genetics (DNA) and biochemistry (proteins). The course will cover the replication and expression of genetic information and the roles of these in diseases. Students will learn about infectious and inherited diseases. The course will cover how scientists have studied diseases and developed treatments for them and what work is currently being done to develop new treatments to disease. The course will have discussions on areas of bioethics.
Human Biology broadly focuses on biological processes important to humans. Students learn about the organization of tissues and organs in the human body, fundamentals of human genetics, physiological processes like blood clotting, and human evolution. In addition, we delve into the biology of important social issues like science communication, genetically modified organisms, genetic disease markers, and vaccines. An overriding focus on science as a process is a unifying theme throughout the course.

Intended to develop an understanding of the operation of biological systems and an acquaintance with basic biological concepts and principles.
 

Study of basic relationships between the environment and humans. Discussion of constraints and relationships in nature from points of view of the physical and life sciences and investigation of how people make decisions to utilize the environment as a resource from the viewpoint of the social sciences. Attempts to link natural and social sciences for awareness of multifaceted nature of environmental problems.

Basic chemical principles are presented, emphasizing their relationship to environmental problems. The course considers the chemical nature of various substances and their impact on the environment. This course focuses on the processes scientists use and developing critical thinking skills to analyze scientific data and claims.

General Chemistry provides students with an understanding of atomic structure, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, electronic atomic structure, periodic properties, chemical bonding, intermolecular attractions and gas laws. These basic concepts allow one to understand aspects of our everyday life such as how iron rusts, why things dissolve, and how calories are determined in food. The course also introduces some of the most exciting discoveries in science. This course demonstrates how it often takes a collection of scientific analytical data to provide clues to the identity of any unknown, emphasizing the idea that science does not always provide complete and unequivocal answers to all questions at one time. The course also provides context for ways to critically analyze scientific data and theories. General Chemistry is also rich in mathematical problem solving that requires high order thinking and analysis.
 

In today’s world, with increasing global population, shifting climate and a growing demand for raw materials and energy, a basic understanding of the earth as a system is more important than ever. ESS aims to illustrate the interconnectedness and complexities of the planet’s principal subsystems of hydrologic, atmospheric, biologic and geologic processes and their impact on shaping the planet and the lives of humans.

 

"An introduction to the study of astronomy, from the early historical development of astronomy as a science to our modern understanding of stars, galaxies, and the Universe. The mathematics will be at the level of high school algebra and geometry. "

 

Other World Civ
 

Study of a range of world literature, across multiple genres, that relates to the experience of the process of “Border Crossings.”
"Global Pasts is a critical examination of a narrative of Global History. Subjects and pedagogical methods of instruction will vary from semester to semester, but professors will help students develop an understanding of other world civilizations by analyzing sources and events from different perspectives in one or multiple non-Western societies. Refer to the History Department website for specific topics/focus. "
"Global Patterns features history courses which focus on non-Western regions of the world. Subject matter will vary semester to semester, but this course will help students develop an understanding of other world civilizations using creative and innovative methods and assist them to develop creative thinking and innovation by studying patterns in the history of other world civilizations. Refer to the History Department website for specific topics/focus."

Global Perspectives focuses on the history of non-Western regions of the world. Subjects and pedagogical methods of instruction will vary from semester to semester, but professors will help students develop an understanding of other world civilizations by using a global and multicultural perspective, focusing on long-term processes and individual patterns via case studies drawn from Africa, the Americas, and Eurasia. Refer to the History Department website for specific topics/focus.
 

This course focuses on how we compare different societies from a political perspective. Issues such as economic development, political system, government structure, representation, political culture, and state capacity are discussed by examining in greater depth particular country cases from both the industrialized and developing world as well as those with different degrees of democratic practice and values.

An introduction to social demography, the course provides an overview of the three basic demographic processes: fertility, mortality, and migration. It evaluates the relationships among these population processes and their interaction with population structures and characteristics, such as age, sex, marital status, race/ethnicity, social class and religion. It also examines contemporary social issues associated with the population processes, including equality, aging, urbanization, women and household structure, economic development and environmental concerns.

The course provides an introduction to micro- and macroeconomic concepts and global economic history with a special emphasis on the ability to weave those basic tools of analysis into the presentation of a narrative of global history.

 

Social Sciences
 

This course will examine the topic of transnational crime in our globalized world. Students will be introduced to various types of transnational crimes including drug trafficking, stolen property, counterfeiting, human trafficking, fraud and cyber-crime, commercial vices, extortion and racketeering, money laundering and corruption, and international terrorism.
 

" In this course, students explore the natural sequence of growth and development from birth through pre-adolescence, with emphasis on the physical, cognitive, emotional, and social dimensions. Students also investigate why and how we study children: research issues and themes, research designs and methodologies, and research evaluation and ethics in the social sciences. "
Study basic principles of educational psychology and sociology, including learning processes, motivation, communication, and classroom management. Introduction to research-validated instructional strategies for teaching students within the full range of abilities. Study the special education process and state and federal special education laws and regulations. Study of the rights and responsibilities of teachers, staff, students, parents, community members, school administrators, and others with regard to education, and the importance of productive relationships and interactions among the school, home, and community for enhancing student learning.

We take a critical examination of the American political system through the lens of current and topical controversies. When major issues arise, what areas of the political system become involved, and how do they respond? Who gets to shape the political response? When do social classes or groups have an impact? When are the institutions themselves reshaped by the dynamics of the controversies?
 

Studies key reasons for how and why countries behave as they do in international politics taking into account the world diversity in politics, cultures, historic trajectories and different levels of economic development. International Relations and Political Science theories and the research methods in the Social Sciences are applied to enhance the understanding of complex global issues such as human rights violations, ethnic conflict, large migration flows, environmental decay, human insecurity, and terrorism with an emphasis on world’s increasing interdependence.
 

Basic concepts, methods, and points of view in psychology. Specific topics span the range from biological to personal to social determinants of behavior.

This course examines the philosophical and sociological foundations of sport in a global society. Through lecture, small and large group discussions, film, personal reflection, and research, students will explore the cultural contributions, challenges and outcomes diverse populations have provided to global sport. Students will be challenged to reflect upon how sport has been influenced by various cultures and diverse groups to develop their own personal philosophy and explore current issues in sport through this historical lens.
 

"This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to major topics and concepts in the study of gender, sexuality, and related systems of domination (race, ethnicity, class, ability, national affiliation, etc.) from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. The course is divided into five thematic sections that group together key concepts within the field of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies: 1) Feminisms; 2) The Social Construction of Gender; 3) Privilege and Oppression; 4) Intersectionality; and 5) Feminist Activism."

 

Western Civ
 

Western Pasts features history courses which focus on Europe. The focus of the course will vary semester to semester, but this course will help students develop an understanding of Western Civilization by analyzing sources and events from different perspectives. Refer to the History Department website for specific topics/focus.

Western Patterns features history courses which focus on Europe. Subjects will vary semester to semester, but professors will help students develop an understanding of western civilization using creative and innovative methods and assist them in developing creative thinking and innovation by studying patterns in the history of Western civilization. Refer to the History Department website for specific topics/focus.
A comprehensive introduction to aspects of Spanish civilization and culture: geography, history, social customs, political movements, literature and art. In English.

The proper form of human association, the just balance of economic, political, and social power, and the nature of the relationship between the state and the individual are explored in the works of prominent historical and contemporary theorists. The course examines the nature of social commitment as viewed by major political philosophies.

A survey of major scientific discoveries, the effect that these discoveries have had on the progress of civilizations, and the relationship between culture, and science.

 

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