FAQ

Frequently Asked Advising Questions

While advising questions are as individual as the students who ask them, here are some of the most commonly asked ones. The answers are from the catalog, which you can see HERE. Remember, the catalog is your agreement with the college, and, as such, it should always be your first point of reference; then check for answers to your specific questions with your assigned advisor or the advising office. Asking informed questions is part of your job as advisee.

Q. How do I find my advisor?

Q. What can I do with my major as far as a career?

Q. What do I bring with me to my advising session?

Q. What is the difference between dropping a course and withdrawing from one?

Q. Why should I pay serious attention to course prerequisites?

Q. I'm thinking about taking more than 18 credit hours, what do I need to do?

Q. What is probation? Do I get a parole officer?

Q. Will my transfer credits from University count?

Q. Can I go to college forever without declaring a major?

Q. Would it help me to retake a course under the course repeat option?

Q. How do I get my average up to a 2.0?

 

Q. How do I find my advisor?

A. Log into Your Connection and click on the Student tab. Then click on Student Records, then Advisor Information. All their contact information is there. Now all you have to do is go introduce yourself and get the relationship heading in the right direction.
 

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Q. What can I do with my major as far as a career?

A. There are plenty of things to do! The Career Development Office's site has many resources if you're wondering what to do with your bachelor's degree. This link in particular is most helpful. You can also watch videos from people in specific careers HERE.
 

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Q. What do I bring with me to my advising session?

A. You should be as prepared for your advising session as your advisor is. Come prepared with a list of classes you would like to take including the CRN (5 digit identification number) and the course name and number.

It also wouldn't hurt to conduct a Degree Evaluation to know exactly where you stand with your CCC's, your major, and your minor (if applicable). Log into Your Connection and click on the Student Tab. Then click on Student Records, then Degree Evaluation. Select the term and click Generate New Evaluation at the bottom of the page. On the next page, make sure to select the program before clicking the generate request button. And VOILA! You now have a nice condensed version of what you've taken, anything you've transferred in, and what you still need to graduate. Print this off and bring it with you to your advising session. You'll be sure to impress your advisor while staying on top of your graduation requirements.
 

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Q. What is the difference between dropping a course and withdrawing from one?

A. When you drop a course on or before the drop deadline (the Friday of the 1st week of classes), the course does not appear on your permanent record. When you withdraw from a course on or before the withdrawal deadline a WC will appear on your record. The drop and withdrawal deadlines are published each semester by the Office of the Registrar and can be found on-line.

Please note: you may still have financial obligations regarding these courses. Refer to the Student Accounts web site at for the withdrawal policy and refund schedule.

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Q. Why should I pay serious attention to course prerequisites?

A. Many courses have prerequisites. A professor can ask you to leave the course if you do not have the prerequisite because you would not be prepared to take it. For instance, do you think you could be successful in an upper level psychology course if you did not take Intro to Psych first? Probably not.
 

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Q. I'm thinking about taking more than 18 credit hours, what do I need to do?

A. For most undergraduate programs, the normal class load is 15 or 16 semester hours. A student who wishes to carry a class load of more than 18 semester hours must secure the approval of his/her department chairperson/program coordinator. The minimum class load to be considered a full-time student is 12 semester hours.
 

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Q. What is probation? Do I get a parole officer?

A. Well, no, but you will have to meet with your advisor at least three times during the semester. Probation occurs when your GPA (Grade Point Average) falls below a 2.0 which is the minimum average needed to graduate. On the other hand, a 3.3 GPA earns you a place on the Dean's List, and that is a very good place to be.

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Q. How do I get my average up to a 2.0?


A. Get out a piece of a paper and a pencil and grab a copy of your transcript and let's go!

1. Write the total number of credit hours you have attempted (GPA hours on transcript) _____

2. Write the total number of credit hours you are taking (or plan to take) this semester _____

3. Add lines 1 and 2 ______

4. Multiply line 3 by 2.0 (the desired GPA) ____

5. Write the total number of quality points you have completed here (QPts on your transcript) _____

6. Subtract line 5 from line 4 _____

7. Divide line 6 by line 2 _____

This is the GPA that you will need this semester to have an overall GPA of 2.O.

An example:

Suzie has earned 12 GPA hours. Her Quality Points are 17.10 and her current GPA is 1.42. She is going to take 16 credit hours this semester.

1. GPA hours 12

2. Credit hours this semester 16

3. Lines 1 and 2 together 28

4. Line 3 x 2.0 56

5. Total QPts 17.10

6. Line 5 subtracted from line 4 38.90

7. Line 6 divide by line 2 2.43
Suzie needs a 2.43 GPA this semester to have a GPA of 2.0 and to be off probation.
 

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Q. Would it help me to retake a course under the course repeat option?

A. Only you know the answer to this one. A student may repeat a course and have the first grade excluded from the calculation of their cumulative quality point average (GPA) if the course is an exact equivalent of the previous course taken. When courses are repeated, the initial grade will remain on the transcript, but an "E" will appear to the right of the initial grade earned, indicating that this grade is excluded from the GPA average calculation. Will it help? That's up to you! At least you have a new chance.

In the example above, if Suzie repeated the course she failed first semester, instead of needing a 2.43 to get off probation, she would need a 2.03.

Please note: Repeated courses may not meet the full time requirements for state funded financial aid. Refer to the Financial Aid Guide section on eligibility for more information.

 

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Q. Will my transfer credits from University count?

A. If you come to Fredonia as a transfer student, your transcript(s) from your other college(s) will be evaluated by the Transfer Advisor in the Registrar's Office. This evaluation will be in your advising folder and you should use it to see where your credits apply to Fredonia's requirements for graduation. You can also view it by logging into Your Connection, clicking on the student tab, and clicking on Transfer Credit Evaluation. Questions about this evaluation should be directed to the Transfer Advisor in the Office of the Registrar.

Once you are a student at Fredonia, you must get prior approval to have credit taken at another college or university transfer in. For instance, if you wanted to take a summer class at a college near your home, you would need prior approval from the chairperson of your major department, your minor department (if applicable), and the Registrar. There is a Transfer Credit Approval form available HERE and you will need a copy of the course description(s) from the other college's catalog. Everyone just wants to be sure that the course really is equivalent to the one required here. You can also check to see if we have the equivalency posted with that college HERE.


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Q. Can I go to college forever without declaring a major?

A. Absolutely not! Of course you need a major to graduate and, in fact, you will not be allowed to course select if you have not declared a major by the time you have 60 hours. As much as you may like to prolong the matter, you are here to get an education, and part of that rather difficult process is deciding what you want to be - at least for the next 25 years or so! That's not to say that you can't change your major - more than once if you'd like! You can do that by obtaining the Change of Major form from the Office of the Registrar, getting written approval for the change from the department chairperson of the intended new major, then getting the approval of the department that you are leaving and returning the form to the Registrar's office. Remember - some majors have GPA requirements, so keep those grades up!

 

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Academic Advising Services

4th Floor - Reed Library
State University of New York at Fredonia
Fredonia, NY 14063
(716) 673-3188